Fig. 1 STRUCTURES OF THE TEMPLE, FACE AND NECK OF THE HUMAN HEAD VIEWED IN HALF-PROFILE AND SLIGHTLY TILTED, AFTER REMOVAL OF THE SKIN
The auricle (1) and the entrance into the external auditory meatus (2), the only visible parts of the hearing mechanism, remain intact. Just in front of the auricle is the large salivatory parotid gland (3). From it the tube-like parotid duct (4) - along which the saliva is discharged in the mouth - sweeps across the masseter (5), the principle chewing muscle. Part of the gland is removed in order to show the network of the facial nerve (VII). From this plexus branches spread to muscles of the face. From the upper end of the parotid gland the superficial temporal artery and vein (6) and the auriculo-temporal nerve (7) emerge to spread over the temporal region. Below the auricle is the upper end of the sterno-cleido-mastoid (8), the principle muscle that turns the head to the opposite side. The muscle is attached to the bony mastoid process (9) of the skull which may be felt right behind the auricle.